What’s LearningRx? Watch the video!

Nov 23, 2016 by

What is LearningRx personal brain training and why does it work? LearningRx one-on-one brain training focuses on a set of seven cognitive skills that allow us to learn easier, think faster, and perform better: http://www.learningrx.com. This video explains what these skills are and how they affect our ability to perform even the simplest tasks. Hear first-hand what LearningRx graduates and their parents have to say about our program. “If you want to gain physical endurance, you exercise with intensity,” says Christina Ledbetter, PhD, neurologist and research fellow at LSU Health Sciences Center. “If you want to gain brain function, you exercise your brain with intensity. It’s that feature of the LearningRx program that most impresses me. We see these great results because we train intensely.” To read the research and results on thousands of LearningRx clients, visit http://www.learningrx.com/results. Watch the video here:...

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LearningRx RCT accepted by Medical News Today

Sep 29, 2016 by

“Much more than ‘brain games”: Clinician-delivered cognitive training improves multiple cognitive skills and general intelligence in children” The results of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) support the efficacy of LearningRx’s ThinkRx personal brain training in improving cognitive skills and IQ scores in students ages 8 to 14. The study showed statistically significant generalized improvements in six cognitive skills – associative memory, working memory, long-term memory, visual and auditory processing, logic and reasoning, and processing speed – as well as a 21-point mean increase in overall General Intelligence Ability (GIA) testing scores, an established measure of IQ....

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LearningRx brain training improved IQ by 21 points

Aug 23, 2016 by

The results of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), published recently in the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology, support the efficacy of the ThinkRx® one-on-one cognitive training program in improving cognitive skills and IQ scores in students ages 8 to 14 years. The study showed statistically significant generalized improvements in six cognitive skills—associative memory, working memory, long-term memory, visual processing, auditory processing, logic and reasoning, and processing speed—as well as a 21-point mean increase in overall General Intelligence Ability (GIA) testing scores, an established measure of IQ. This is the first RCT to evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive, one-on-one cognitive training program targeting multiple cognitive abilities, offering an important contribution to the knowledge base on cognitive training effects in children. It was led by Dick M. Carpenter II, PhD, University of Colorado Colorado Springs; Christina Ledbetter, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; and Amy Lawson Moore, PhD, Gibson Institute of Cognitive Research. Their findings also support the use of theCattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of intelligence in the design of cognitive training programs to ensure multiple cognitive skills are targeted by training exercises. “I’m excited about what the changes in GIA score and other cognitive skills could mean in terms of brain connectivity, network efficiency, and overall cognitive processing.” DR. CHRISTINA LEDBETTER, NEUROSCIENTIST AND RESEARCH FELLOW AT LSU HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER The study evaluated the effects of ThinkRx, a program that targets seven core cognitive skills based on the CHC theory...

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Gibson Institute of Cognitive Research Opens

Aug 1, 2014 by

Scientific Foundation Focuses on Cognitive Training Results and Development A new scientific organization dedicated to analyzing the results of cognitive training has opened in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The mission of the Gibson Institute of Cognitive Research is to conduct empirical research on cognitive training programs and assessments, and to communicate the latest research findings to the education and cognitive science communities. “In addition, we’ll be providing opportunities for students, faculty and researchers to participate in research projects that use our cognitive training and assessment instruments,” says Director Amy Moore. “We also want to inform the practices of cognitive trainers through rigorous testing of training programs and procedures in both the laboratory and ecologically valid training environments.” The institute is named for Dr. Ken Gibson, a pioneer in the cognitive training field who has developed cognitive training programs and assessments over the last four decades. While running his clinical practice, Dr. Gibson and his team trained more than 600 educators, psychologists, and clinicians to deliver comprehensive one-on-one cognitive skills training. Over the last 10 years, he and his team have continuously studied the results of learning and cognition research to hone these commercially available cognitive training programs and to develop new targeted math and reading interventions. His programs have been highly successful not only with thousands of struggling children, but also with those suffering from age-related memory loss and traumatic brain injury. According to Moore, the impetus behind the formation...

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Traumatic Brain Injury: Damaged Neural Connections Can Be Rewired...

Jun 17, 2013 by

Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death for persons under 45 years of age, with someone sustaining a TBI every 15 seconds. In America alone 5 million people suffer some form of TBI disability. When the brain is injured, neural connections are damaged and how we process information is impacted, which is why TBI patients often struggle with cognitive functions such as thinking, memory, reason, information processing, and communication. Most rehabilitation efforts focus on physical, occupational, speech/language, psychological and/or drug therapies. During this process, expectations are adjusted, life skills and motor skills are relearned, and accommodations and modifications are explored. Cognitive therapies take a different approach, stimulating the brain to physically reorganize itself so that one or all of the following occurs: Injured neural connections are repaired Brand new connections are created Information is rerouted around damaged areas For someone with a traumatic brain injury, this new approach offers extraordinary hope for dramatic or full recovery. To learn more about how brain training can be life changing for people with TBI, take a look at this...

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“The Brain Trainers” (New York Times feature article)...

Nov 4, 2012 by

The New York Times wrote a great feature piece on LearningRx:...

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