Brain-stimulating activities at any age may preserve memory

Jul 31, 2013 by

New research indicates that reading books, writing and participating in brain-stimulating activities at ANY age may preserve memory. People who participated in mental activity both early and late in life had a slower rate of decline in memory. In fact, mental activity accounted for almost 15% of the difference in decline (between the brains with and without cognitive decline postmortem) beyond what is attributed to tangles and plaques in the brain....

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Breaking the Link Between Vision and Dyslexia

Jul 30, 2013 by

It took awhile for those rumors about vision problems being the cause of dyslexia to subside, but they’re finally being disproved. New research from Georgetown University Medical Center have published research showing the real cause of dyslexia....

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New early indication of Alzheimer’s – even years before diagnosis...

Jul 30, 2013 by

Researchers found that the loss of gray matter in the left hemisphere of the brain was a strong indicator that a patient would develop Alzheimer’s. The section of the brain deals with language, decision-making, expressing personality, executing movement, moderating social behavior and planning complex cognitive behavior....

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Neurobiologists find “switch” for long-term memory...

Jul 29, 2013 by

Researchers have identified calcium in the cell nucleus as the “switch” that forms long-term memories. The theory is that the “switch” may not work as well as we age. This discovery may open new treatment ideas for age-related changes in brain functions....

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Epilepsy can add to earlier cognitive decline

Jul 28, 2013 by

People with epilepsy who also had Alzheimer’s or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) had 5.5 years to 6.8 years earlier cognitive decline than non-epileptics. In addition, people with Alzheimer’s and seizure disorders have more rapid progression of symptoms and more severe neuronal loss....

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Analyzing resting brain connections can predict learning ability...

Jul 27, 2013 by

Using MRIs, researchers studied human brains at rest and during the performance of a new task (before and after a training over two weeks). They found that participants who had greater connectivity between two particular regions of the brain did better on the learning tasks....

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