LearningRx reviews study on training the brain to boost confidence...

Mar 21, 2017 by

Scientists at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International in Kyoto, Japan have discovered how to manipulate brain activity to increase self-confidence....

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Study: Development of Executive Functions

Feb 14, 2017 by

Abstract Executive functions refer to top–down processes utilized in goal-directed behavior. Executive functions and academic achievement relate robustly, from early childhood through adolescence. Executive functions and their neural networks appear to be malleable, and environments can support their development. Varied approaches, including educational curricula, structured physical exercise, and computer-based training, can improve executive functions. The intervention work suggests that children who are most “at-risk” demonstrate the largest gains, but evidence of far transfer to academic achievement or other behavioral outcomes that are important to schools is at this point only promising. The review highlights developmental considerations for measurement and intervention, and discusses implications for schools in supporting children’s development of executive functions. Policy implications of the scientific findings suggest strategies for providing environments that foster the development of executive functions. Development of Executive Function_mentions...

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Brain training may help keep seniors on the road

Jan 14, 2017 by

A Penn State University study of over 2,000 adults 65 or older found that those who participated in training designed to improve cognitive abilities are more likely to continue driving over the next decade....

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What’s LearningRx? Watch the video!

Nov 23, 2016 by

What is LearningRx personal brain training and why does it work? LearningRx one-on-one brain training focuses on a set of seven cognitive skills that allow us to learn easier, think faster, and perform better: http://www.learningrx.com. This video explains what these skills are and how they affect our ability to perform even the simplest tasks. Hear first-hand what LearningRx graduates and their parents have to say about our program. “If you want to gain physical endurance, you exercise with intensity,” says Christina Ledbetter, PhD, neurologist and research fellow at LSU Health Sciences Center. “If you want to gain brain function, you exercise your brain with intensity. It’s that feature of the LearningRx program that most impresses me. We see these great results because we train intensely.” To read the research and results on thousands of LearningRx clients, visit http://www.learningrx.com/results. Watch the video here:...

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Brain training to combat stress

Nov 5, 2016 by

Research from Tel-Aviv University indicates that a new imaging technique might help people self-regulate their emotional responses. The tool provides feedback on electrical activity in the amygdala, which regulates things like fear and stress. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/312877.php Other types of brain training, such as LearningRx’s one-on-one cognitive skills training, has been shown to be effective for a number of things. Past studies have shown it to increase IQ, strengthen a variety of cognitive skills and increase confidence. Visit www.LearningRx.com to learn...

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Analysis of Resting State Functional Connectivity in a Cognitive Training Intervention Study...

Aug 27, 2016 by

Abstract: As part of a larger randomized controlled study by Hill, Zewelanji, and Faison (2015), 30 of the 225 participating high school students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: ThinkRx, BrainSkills, or study hall (control). In addition to pre and post cognitive testing these students underwent pre and post MRI imaging. Functional MRI was used to assess changes in resting state functional connectivity associated with cognitive training, and correlation of changes in functional connectivity to cognitive testing findings. Analysis of cognitive testing scores found that the cognitive training groups scored significantly higher than controls on multiple tasks, with the most significant gain occurring in auditory processing: auditory analysis segmenting (F=16.3, p=0.000) and auditory analysis drop (F=13.6, p=0.001). Analysis of resting state connectivity with the auditory cortex (superior temporal gyrus and right anterior temporal gyrus) revealed significant changes in the resting state connectivity with multiple cortical regions involved in cognitive processing (Figure 1). In addition, an increase in global network efficiency (network T=2.44, p-unc 0.02; PaCiG l : T=4.56, p-FDR=.01; MedFC: T=4.14, p-FDR=0.02; pITG l: T=-3.05, p-FDR=0.23; aSTG r: T=2.86, p-FDR=0.27) was found to occur following cognitive training (Figure 2). Further, analysis revealed that network changes correlated to auditory processing gains. Reference: Ledbetter, C., Faison, M., Hill, O., & Patterson, J. (2016). Analysis of Resting State Functional Connectivity in a Cognitive Training Intervention Study. Poster presented at Center for Brain Health Annual Symposium: Reprogramming the Brain to Health: Computational Psychiatry...

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Training the Brain: Beyond Vision Therapy

Aug 23, 2016 by

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the ThinkRx cognitive training program. Sixty-one children (ages 6–18) were given pretest and post-test assessments using seven batteries from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement. Thirty-one of the students were enrolled in or had completed a 24-week cognitive training program in a LearningRx center. A propensity matched control group of thirty students was selected from a group who had pretested but chosen not to enroll in the cognitive training program. Students who completed the ThinkRx cognitive training program realized greater gains than the control group on all measures. Statistically significant differences between groups were noted in six of the seven sets of scores (ps < .001). There were no significant differences based on age, gender, or learning disability. Multiple regression analyses indicated that treatment group membership was a statistically significant predictor of pretest to post-test score differences in associative memory (R2= .445), logic and reasoning (R2= .233), working memory (R2= .265), processing speed (R2= .409), auditory processing (R2= .352), and Word Attack (R2= .359). Completion of the cognitive training program was not a significant predictor of scores on visual processing. Reference: Gibson, K., Carpenter, D., Moore, A.L., & Mitchell, T. (2015). Training the Brain to Learn: Beyond Vision Therapy. Vision Development and Rehabilitation, 1(2), 119–128. To learn more, download LearningRx’s 48-page 2016 edition of “Client Outcomes and Research Results,”  here:...

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