WHITE PAPER: Brain Plasticity and Cognition

Jun 23, 2013 by

“Brain Plasticity and Cognition; A Review of the Literature” by Lori Bryan, Ph.D....

read more

Effectiveness of brain training in a school setting

Jun 18, 2013 by

Summary of Findings from a Study on the Effectiveness of LearningRx Brain Training in a School Setting In a study led by Dr. Oliver W. Hill, chair of the Virginia State University psychology department, 57 high school students were randomly selected to participate in brain training programs in a school setting. Dr. Hill and team members Dr. Zewelanji Serpell and Omar Faison (professors in the Virginia State University departments of Psychology and Biology, respectively) wrote about their findings in a paper entitled Summary of Findings from a Randomized Control Study on the Efficacy of the LearningRx and Brainskills Cognitive Training Programs in a School Setting. In the study, students were randomly assigned to three different groups. Each student in the first group met individually with a LearningRx brain trainer for one-on-one brain training five hours a week for 15 weeks. Using a program called BrainSkills, a second group did digital brain training on a computer five hours a week for 15 weeks. A control group did not receive any brain training. Researchers found that, in four out of 11 cognitive skills, students who did BrainSkills digital brain training showed significant development over students in the control group. Students who received one-on-one training with a LearningRx brain trainer, however, outperformed both groups. These students demonstrated significant development in nine out of 11 cognitive skills over control group students. These findings are significant for parents and educators who are looking for...

read more

Traumatic Brain Injury: Damaged Neural Connections Can Be Rewired...

Jun 17, 2013 by

Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death for persons under 45 years of age, with someone sustaining a TBI every 15 seconds. In America alone 5 million people suffer some form of TBI disability. When the brain is injured, neural connections are damaged and how we process information is impacted, which is why TBI patients often struggle with cognitive functions such as thinking, memory, reason, information processing, and communication. Most rehabilitation efforts focus on physical, occupational, speech/language, psychological and/or drug therapies. During this process, expectations are adjusted, life skills and motor skills are relearned, and accommodations and modifications are explored. Cognitive therapies take a different approach, stimulating the brain to physically reorganize itself so that one or all of the following occurs: Injured neural connections are repaired Brand new connections are created Information is rerouted around damaged areas For someone with a traumatic brain injury, this new approach offers extraordinary hope for dramatic or full recovery. To learn more about how brain training can be life changing for people with TBI, take a look at this...

read more

Major drug breakthrough to treat Alzheimer’s

Jun 13, 2013 by

A new drug called NitroMemantine has been found to boost brain synapses lost to Alzheimer’s disease. By combining two medicines that are already approved by the FDA, NitroMemantine restores the synapses between neurons. It’s the destruction of these synapses that leads to cognitive decline and memory loss. In the past, drugs aimed to treat Alzheimer’s disease have addressed the amyloid beta plaques or neurofibrillary tangles – without much success. But NitroMemantine brings the number of synapses back to normal within just a few months! (These tests are done on mice.) This may bring hope to not only early-stage Alzheimer’s patients, but also those who have experienced the disease’s progression....

read more

Concussions affect boys and girls differently

Jun 10, 2013 by

Concussions may affect boys and girls differently. Although girls may suffer fewer concussions, the effects on girls may last longer. This may be because male athletes have greater neck strength and a higher BMI, making them more resilient....

read more

Anesthesia can increase dementia risk by 35%

Jun 10, 2013 by

Elderly who undergo anesthesia could increase their risk of dementia by 35%. It’s called POCD (postoperative cognitive dysfunction) and it’s common in the elderly. It’s not set in stone, but this recent study shows that POCD may be a precursor of dementia – even several years later....

read more