Single concussion can cause structural damage to brain

Mar 12, 2013 by

Just one concussion can cause lasting structural damage to the brain, including measureable volume loss. The two areas particularly affected are the anterior cingulated (linked to mood disorders/depression) and the precuneal region (lots of connections to areas that control executive function/higher order thinking). http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312092642.htm...

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Sleep loss early predictor of Alzheimer’s

Mar 11, 2013 by

An early predictor of Alzheimer’s is often sleep loss. According to a new report in the March 11, 2013 issue of JAMA Neurology, sleep disruption may precede other more recognizable symptoms like memory loss or other cognitive problems....

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Study shows adults learn as well as college students

Mar 7, 2013 by

Adults of any age can learn from tests (vs. just rereading or restudying information). In this particular study, the improvement of the adults was significant and comparable to that of the college students....

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Enriched environments help fight off Alzheimer’s

Mar 6, 2013 by

More proof that “use it or lose it” applies to the aging brain. A new study published in the March 6, 2013 issue of “Neuron” found that “prolonged exposure to an enriched environment” activated receptors in the brain, which in turn triggered a signaling pathway that kept amyloid beta protein (the stuff that forms senile plaques) from weakening communication between cells in the hippocampus. (The hippocampus deals with short- and long-term memory.)...

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Brain adds new cells during puberty that are vital in adulthood...

Mar 6, 2013 by

In a recent study (that used hamsters), neuroscientists showed that during puberty, the brain adds new cells in the amygdala (and its connected regions) – the brain region that deals with reading and understanding social cues. For humans, that means evaluating body language and facial expressions (especially in the opposite sex). But all these cells didn’t die off after puberty; some became part of the neural networks involved in adult social and sexual behavior. This was even more prevalent in male hamsters raised in an “enriched environment” (bigger cage with a running wheel, nesting materials and other features – vs. a plain cage). For these males, even more of the new brain cells survived and became functional....

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ADHD stays through adulthood for many

Mar 4, 2013 by

A new large study has found that ADHD often doesn’t go away when kids become adults, and that kids with ADHD are more likely to have other psychiatric disorders as adults. They’re also more likely to commit suicide and be incarcerated as adults....

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